Privacy Questions with NSLDS Student Loan Information

The National Student Loan Data System, or NSLDS, compiles every bit of data involving federal student loans availed by undergraduate and graduate students. Because the NSLDS is keeping the personal, financial and loan information of every student, the question of who can retrieve your information might be a privacy issue that you are worried about. Below are questions and answers tackling the privacy and security matters of your student loan information.

What Data Is Found in the NSLDS?

The data that can be retrieved in the NSLDS are the student's full name; Social Security number; date of birth; address; gender; citizenship; family income; school enrollment and status; course of study; and types of student loans obtained, including the amount and the status of the loan.

Who Can Obtain Student Information in the NSLDS?

The following private and government agencies as well as entities with the kinds of disclosure notices indicated may gather information from the NSLDS about a student account:

  • Agencies under the federal and state governments
  • Accredited consumer reporting agencies (Experian, Equifax and Trans Union)
  • Labor organization disclosure
  • Administrative disclosures
  • Contract disclosure
  • Enforcement disclosure
  • Department of Justice disclosure
  • Congressional member disclosure
  • Freedom of Information Act advice disclosure
  • Employee grievance, complaint, or conduct disclosure
  • Litigation and alternative dispute resolution disclosure


When Can the Student Loan Information Be Shared with the Above-Mentioned Agencies or in Response to the Listed Kinds of Disclosures?

Private or government groups will be given the right to collect student loan information only when the purpose of the request adheres to the provisions stated in the Privacy Act. Any purpose for gathering the information that does not comply with the law is not allowed by the Department of Education.


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