How to Conduct a Short Term Disability Claim

Short term disability claims will require different steps depending on your insurance as well as your disability. There are some basic and universal requirements, but there are also some particulars you should be aware of.

Basic Requirements

If you were hurt on the job, you will be eligible for workers compensation and not disability. Do not file a claim for an on the job injury.

Save all of your paper work from the doctor or hospital. Any contact you have with a medical professional may be used to verify or deny your claim, so it is essential you keep good records.

Save all of your paper work for the insurance claims. Any contact you have with the company should be documented.

Specific Requirements

Injury compensation typically starts immediately. It is easier for insurance companies to verify an injury will keep you out of work, and you should be eligible from day one.

Illness compensation may be delayed a week or longer. The insurance company needs to assure you will actually be prevented from working for an extended period of time prior to beginning your reimbursement.

Check with your employer as well as your insurance company. Your employer cannot be paying you for the time you are out of work; if they are, then you will not be eligible for disability payments.

 



Are my short term disability checks taxed?



You must pay taxes on any income you receive if you are a United States citizen, and this includes short term disability. Unlike income paid by large organizations, short term disability checks often do not have an automatic tax deduction. You may be able to set up this deduction in order to save yourself hassle come time to pay your taxes. You may also consider making estimated tax payments on a quarterly basis on the funds you receive. At the end of the year, you will have to report all income, including short term disability, to the IRS. If you paid no taxes on this income during the year, you may face additional fees beyond your regular income tax. 

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