Auto Insurance Liability Requirements to Note

Auto insurance liability protects you and your family if you suffer a loss or if others suffer a loss for which you are responsible.

Requirements

Most auto liability insurance packages have specific requirements they must cover. These requirements can vary from state to state, so be sure to ask your agent which apply to you.  Liability coverage for your auto is mandatory in most states and each state has laws outlining the minimum levels of insurance required. Some states, however, do not require liability coverage if you have enough assets to cover you in the event of an accident.

Following is a list of these general requirements:
  1. Bodily injury – covers others’ bodily injuries or death, but does not cover you or others on your policy for bodily injuries or death. This coverage is mandatory in most states.
  2. Property damage – covers you in the event you damage another’s property.
  1. Physical damage:
  • Comprehensive – covers your vehicle or any vehicles you drive for loss that includes stolen or damage caused by fire, flood, or animals. This is generally only required if you have a lease or loan on the vehicle.
  • Collision – covers your vehicle in the event of an accident and pays to fix it. This is generally only required if you have a lease or loan on the vehicle.
Bear in mind that the limits set by your state may not be enough to adequately cover you in the event of an accident. Sometimes, a car accident breaches the limits of cBelow is a list of states with their respective requirements for liability coverage:overage your state requires. On average, a person should carry approximately $100,000 for bodily injury and $300,000 per accident in order to cover them properly.

Below is a list of states with their respective requirements for liability coverage:

How to Read the Numbers

The first two numbers following each state are for bodily injury limits in thousands, and the third number is the property damage limit in thousands of dollars.
  • 1st number: bodily injury maximum per person injured during the accident
  • 2nd number: bodily injury maximum for all injuries occurred during the accident
  • 3rd number: property damage maximum per accident
These numbers reflect the minimum requirements you must have in accordance to your state’s law regarding auto insurance.  For example, California shows 15/30/5.  In California, the bodily injury maximum limit per person is $15,000.00, bodily injury maximum for all injured parties is $30,000.00, and the property damage maximum is $5,000.00.
  • Alaska - 50/100/25
  • Alabama - 20/40/10
  • Arkansas - 25/50/15
  • Arizona - 15/30/10
  • California - 15/30/5
  • Colorado - 25/50/15
  • Connecticut - 20/40/10
  • Delaware - 15/30/5
  • Florida - 10/20/10
  • Georgia - 15/30/10
  • Hawaii - 20/40/10
  • Idaho - 20/50/15
  • Illinois - 20/40/15
  • Indiana - 25/50/10
  • Iowa - 20/40/15
  • Kansas - 25/50/10
  • Kentucky - 25/50/10
  • Louisiana - 10/20/10
  • Maine - 50/100/25
  • Maryland - 20/40/10
  • Massachusetts - 20/40/5
  • Michigan - 20/40/10
  • Minnesota - 30/60/10
  • Mississippi - 25/50/25
  • Missouri - 25/50/10
  • Montana - 25/50/10
  • Nebraska - 25/50/25
  • New Hampshire - 25/50/25
  • New Jersey - 15/30/5
  • New Mexico - 25/50/10
  • Nevada - 15/30/10
  • New York - 25/50/10
  • North Carolina - 30/60/25
  • North Dakota - 25/50/25
  • Ohio - 12.5/25/7.5
  • Oklahoma - 10/20/10
  • Oregon - 25/50/10
  • Pennsylvania - 15/30/5
  • Rhode Island - 25/50/25
  • South Carolina - 15/30/10
  • South Dakota - 25/50/25
  • Tennessee - 25/50/10
  • Texas - 20/40/15
  • Utah - 25/65/15
  • Virginia - 25/50/20
  • Vermont - 25/50/10
  • Washington - 25/50/10
  • Wisconsin - 25/50/10
  • West Virginia - 20/40/10
  • Wyoming - 25/50/20
Keep in mind that these numbers can change.
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